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Neurosurgery. 2008 Mar;62(3):674-82; discussion 674-82. doi: 10.1227/01.neu.0000317316.56235.a7.

Cervical spondylotic myelopathy treated by oblique corpectomy: a prospective study.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul University Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey. talat.kiris@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Anterolateral partial oblique corpectomy (OC) aims to decompress the cervical spinal cord without subsequent fusion and saves the patient from graft-, instrument-, and fusion-related complications. Although it is a promising technique, there are few studies dealing with its efficacy and safety.

METHODS:

In this prospective study, 40 consecutive patients underwent an OC (one to four levels from C3 to C7) for cervical spondylotic myelopathy; they ranged in age from 43 to 78 years (mean, 55 yr). The average follow-up period was 59 months (range, 24-98 mo). Clinical and radiological data were analyzed to assess the results and find possible factors related to outcomes.

RESULTS:

Thirty-seven (92.5%) of the 40 patients improved by the 6-month follow-up examination according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association score. The improvement was the most prominent in lower extremity dysfunction. Recovery was positively correlated with the preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association score (r = 0.37, P = 0.018). Permanent Horner's syndrome developed in four patients (10%). During the long-term follow-up period, neurological improvement was maintained and there were no signs of postoperative instability, posture change, or axial pain.

CONCLUSION:

OC for treating multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy achieved good results with a low morbidity rate. The results of the current study suggest that OC is a good alternative to conventional median corpectomy and fusion techniques in selected cases.

PMID:
18425014
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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