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Clin Psychol Rev. 2008 Oct;28(7):1108-24. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2008.03.004. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

A scientific agenda for the concept of recovery as it applies to schizophrenia.

Author information

  • 1University Behavioral HealthCare and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, United States. silvers1@umdnj.edu

Abstract

Recovery is now a widely discussed concept in the field of research, treatment, and public policy regarding schizophrenia. As it has increasingly become a focus in mainstream psychiatry, however, it has also become clear both that the concept is often used in multiple ways, and that it lacks a strong scientific basis. In this review, we argue that such a scientific basis is necessary for the concept of recovery to have a significant long-term impact on the way that schizophrenia is understood and treated. The discussion focuses on key issues necessary to establish this scientific agenda, including: 1) differences in definitions of recovery and their implications for studying recovery processes and outcomes; 2) key research questions; 3) the implications of data from outcome studies for understanding what is possible for people diagnosed with schizophrenia; 4) factors that facilitate recovery processes and outcomes, and methods for studying these issues; and 5) recovery-oriented treatment, including issues raised by peer support. Additional conceptual issues that have not received sufficient attention in the literature are then noted, including the role of evidence-based practices in recovery-oriented care, recovery-oriented care for elderly people with schizophrenia, trauma treatment and trauma-informed care, and the role of hospitals in recovery-oriented treatment. Consideration of these issues may help to organize approaches to the study of recovery, and in doing so, improve the impact of recovery-based initiatives.

PMID:
18420322
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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