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Brain Inj. 2008 May;22(5):387-95. doi: 10.1080/02699050802008075.

Cognitive and affective outcomes of more severe compared to less severe carbon monoxide poisoning.

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  • 1Psychology Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.

Erratum in

  • Brain Inj. 2008 Dec;22(13-14):1038.

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

To assess cognitive sequelae, depression and anxiety following carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

This study prospectively followed 256 patients, 55 with less severe and 201 with more severe CO-poisoning. The prevalence of cognitive sequelae, depression and anxiety at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months was compared in patients with less severe and more severe CO-poisoning.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Of the less severe CO-poisoned patients, 39% had cognitive sequelae, 21% depression and 30% anxiety at 6 weeks. Of the more severe CO-poisoned patients, 35% had cognitive sequelae, 16% depression and 11% anxiety at 6 weeks. There was no difference in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae at any time. The prevalence of depression was higher in patients with less compared with more severe CO-poisoning at 6 months (p = 0.04), but not 6 weeks or 12 months. The prevalence of anxiety was higher in patients with less compared to more severe CO-poisoning at 6 weeks (p = 0.008), but not 6 or 12 months. Anxiety decreased over time in the less severe group (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

CO-related cognitive sequelae, depression and anxiety are common and may be independent of poisoning severity.

PMID:
18415719
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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