Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Annu Rev Nutr. 2008;28:367-88. doi: 10.1146/annurev.nutr.28.061807.155458.

Nutritional implications of genetic taste variation: the role of PROP sensitivity and other taste phenotypes.

Author information

  • Department of Food Science, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA. tepper@aesop.rutgers.edu

Abstract

Genetic sensitivity to the bitter taste of phenylthiocarbamide and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) is a well-studied human trait. It has been hypothesized that this phenotype is a marker for individual differences in taste perception that influence food preferences and dietary behavior with subsequent links to body weight and chronic disease risk. Steady progress has been made over the past several decades in defining the involvement of this phenotype and its underlying gene, TAS2R38, in this complex behavioral pathway. However, more work needs to be done to fully determine its overall nutritional and health significance. The primary goal of this review is to assess our current understanding of the role of the PROP bitter taste phenotype in food selection and body weight in both children and adults. A brief history of the field is included and controversies surrounding the use of different PROP screening methods are addressed. The contribution of other receptors (both bitter and nonbitter) to human taste variation is also discussed.

PMID:
18407743
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk