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Br J Nutr. 2008 Dec;100(6):1192-9. doi: 10.1017/S0007114508975607. Epub 2008 Apr 11.

Effects of lifelong intervention with an oligofructose-enriched inulin in rats on general health and lifespan.

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  • 1ETAP - Applied Ethology, 13 rue du Bois de la Champelle, F-54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. email prozan@etap-lab.com

Abstract

Ageing is associated with changes in physiology and morphology; nutritional strategies to decrease morbidity and to prolong life are of high interest. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of lifelong supplementation with an oligofructose-enriched inulin on morphological and biological markers and lifespan in male and female rats. Male and female rats, age 3 months, were randomised into two groups to receive either a diet with 10 % of an oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy 1) or a standard diet (control) for 27 months. The rats were weighed every 2 weeks and their food intake was evaluated on four successive days every 4-6 weeks. Samples were taken at 12, 18 and 24 months of age. During the whole intervention period, male rats receiving Synergy 1 (SYN1-M) displayed lower body weight, cholesterol and plasma triacylglycerolaemia compared with the controls (Cont-M). The survival rate at 24 months of age of SYN1-M rats was 35.3 % greater than that of Cont-M rats. In female rats, the Synergy 1 supplementation (SYN1-F) group also reduced body weight, cholesterol and triacylglycerolaemia levels, but results were less consistent over the experiment. The survival rate at 24 months of age in SYN1-F rats was 33.3 % greater compared with that of the control (Cont-F) group. To conclude, lifelong intervention with Synergy 1 improved biological markers during ageing and survival rate (lifespan) of rats.

PMID:
18405402
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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