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Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Jul;72(1):137-45. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2008.02.012. Epub 2008 Apr 18.

Relationship of health behavior theories with self-efficacy among insufficiently active hypertensive African-American women.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Ave South, 1717 11th Ave South - MT-617, Birmingham, AL 35294-4410, United States. mymartin@uab.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

While self-efficacy plays an important role in physical activity, relatively little research has examined this construct in minorities. This study identified theoretical correlates associated with self-efficacy among insufficiently active, hypertensive Black women.

METHODS:

Correlates of self-efficacy to: (1) overcoming barriers to physical activity; (2) making time for activity; and (3) "sticking with" physical activity were studied.

RESULTS:

Sixty-one women (M=50.48+/-4.2 years) participated. We accounted for 32% of the variance in confidence in overcoming barriers. Women confident in overcoming barriers reported less worry about physical activity. The TTM processes of change were also in the model: consciousness raising, environmental reevaluation, counter conditioning, and self-liberation. We accounted for 16% of the variance in "making time" self-efficacy. An aversiveness barrier (e.g., physical activity is boring, physical activity is hard work) was the dominant variable in the model. Confidence to 'stick with' physical activity was associated with self-reevaluation (i.e., reflection on how personal values correspond to behavior). Social support and competing demands were not associated with self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Consistent with Social Cognitive Theory, results suggest that self-efficacy is behavior specific and each measure likely provides unique information.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Interventions should be tailored to address specific self-efficacy types.

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PMID:
18395395
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3241441
Free PMC Article
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