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Mol Ther. 2008 Jun;16(6):1056-64. doi: 10.1038/mt.2008.60. Epub 2008 Apr 1.

Delivery of AAV-IGF-1 to the CNS extends survival in ALS mice through modification of aberrant glial cell activity.

Author information

  • 1Genzyme Corporation, Framingham, Massachusetts 01701-9322, USA. jim.dodge@genzyme.com

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of the motor system. Recent work in rodent models of ALS has shown that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) slows disease progression when delivered at disease onset. However, IGF-1's mechanism of action along the neuromuscular axis remains unclear. In this study, symptomatic ALS mice received IGF-1 through stereotaxic injection of an IGF-1-expressing viral vector to the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), a region of the cerebellum with extensive brain stem and spinal cord connections. We found that delivery of IGF-1 to the central nervous system (CNS) reduced ALS neuropathology, improved muscle strength, and significantly extended life span in ALS mice. To explore the mechanism of action of IGF-1, we used a newly developed in vitro model of ALS. We demonstrate that IGF-1 is potently neuroprotective and attenuates glial cell-mediated release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO). Our results show that delivering IGF-1 to the CNS is sufficient to delay disease progression in a mouse model of familial ALS and demonstrate for the first time that IGF-1 attenuates the pathological activity of non-neuronal cells that contribute to disease progression. Our findings highlight an innovative approach for delivering IGF-1 to the CNS.

PMID:
18388910
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2737251
Free PMC Article

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