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Fertil Steril. 2009 Jun;91(6):2593-5. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.02.008. Epub 2008 Apr 1.

Foreign fetal cells persist in the maternal circulation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. zwilliams2@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether allogenic fetal cells resulting from donor egg pregnancies persist in maternal circulation.

DESIGN:

Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the DYS14 sequence, a region of the Y chromosome, from DNA purified from peripheral blood cells.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PATIENT(S):

Healthy 18-60-year-old women who have had donor egg pregnancies resulting in a male offspring (n = 11) or, as a control, female offspring (n = 8), at least 1 year previously and without any other source for male cells in their peripheral blood or a healthy male.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Detection of DYS14 sequence by nested PCR.

RESULT(S):

DYS14 was detected in 5/11 (45%) of women who had donor egg pregnancies resulting in a male offspring, but in 0/8 (0) of women who had donor egg pregnancies resulting in a female offspring. The longest interval between delivery of a male offspring and detection of the DYS14 gene was 9 years.

CONCLUSION(S):

Unmatched, allogenic fetal cells from donor egg pregnancies are able to persist in the circulation of healthy women for at least 9 years after delivery. This implies a novel mechanism by which immunologic detection is avoided by these cells and may impact on how they may be used for regenerative and transplant medicine.

PMID:
18384774
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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