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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Mar;40(3):433-43. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31815f38f1.

Reduced diabetic, hypertensive, and cholesterol medication use with walking.

Author information

  • Donner Laboratory, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. ptwilliams@lbl.gov

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the relationships of walking distance, frequency, and intensity to the prevalence of antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and LDL cholesterol-lowering medications use.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analyses of 32,683 female and 8112 male participants of the National Walkers' Health Study, of whom 2.8% and 7.4% reported antidiabetic, 14.3% and 29.0% reported antihypertensive, and 7.3% and 21.5% reported LDL cholesterol-lowering medication use, respectively.

RESULTS:

Weekly walking distance, longest walk, and walking intensity were inversely related to the prevalence of antidiabetic (males: P < 0.001, females: P < 0.0001), antihypertensive (males: P < 0.01, females: P < 0.0001), and LDL cholesterol-lowering medications (males: P < 0.01, females: P < 0.0001). Each medication remained significantly related to both walking intensity and longest weekly walk when adjusted for total weekly distance. Compared with men and women who walked at a speed of < 1.2 m.s, those who walked > 2.1 m.s had 48% and 52% lower odds for antihypertensive, 68% and 59% lower odds for antidiabetic, and 53% and 40% lower odds for LDL cholesterol-lowering medications, respectively, when adjusted for age, smoking, and diet. The longest usual weekly walk was a better discriminator of medication status than the total cumulative distance per week, particularly in men.

CONCLUSION:

These results are consistent with the hypothesis that antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and LDL cholesterol-lowering medication use may be reduced substantially by walking more intensely and farther each week, and by including longer walks.

PMID:
18379204
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3640497
Free PMC Article

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