Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Fertil Steril. 2008 Nov;90(5):2008.e5-8. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.01.071. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

Does the fimbria have an embryologic origin distinct from that of the rest of the fallopian tube?

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Division of Gynecology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To propose a new theory describing the development of the fallopian tube fimbria.

DESIGN:

Case series report.

SETTING:

Metropolitan tertiary care children's hospital.

PATIENT(S):

Two girls, aged 12 and 20 years, who presented with pelvic pain.

INTERVENTION(S):

Magnetic resonance imaging, laparoscopy with salpingectomy, and pathologic analysis.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Description of a novel theory regarding the embryologic development of the fallopian tube and its fimbria.

RESULT(S):

In two non-sexually active girls the cause of their pelvic pain was found to be a hydrosalpinx associated with a discontinuous fallopian tube in which the fimbriated end did not directly communicate with the remainder of the fallopian tube.

CONCLUSION(S):

The two cases of pure congenital fallopian tube atresia, the presence of fimbriae in patients with müllerian (uterine, cervical, and vaginal) agenesis, and the role of the fimbria in ovarian-like and peritoneal cancers, support a novel hypothesis that the fimbria of the fallopian tube may arise separately from the rest of the tube.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk