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Diabetes Care. 2008 Jun;31(6):1254-6. doi: 10.2337/dc07-2001. Epub 2008 Mar 10.

Markedly blunted metabolic effects of fructose in healthy young female subjects compared with male subjects.

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  • 1Department of Physiology, Lausanne University School of Biology and Medicine, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the metabolic effects of fructose in healthy male and female subjects.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Fasting metabolic profile and hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed by means of a hyperglycemic clamp in 16 healthy young male and female subjects after a 6-day fructose overfeeding.

RESULTS:

Fructose overfeeding increased fasting triglyceride concentrations by 71 vs. 16% in male vs. female subjects, respectively (P < 0.05). Endogenous glucose production was increased by 12%, alanine aminotransferase concentration was increased by 38%, and fasting insulin concentrations were increased by 14% after fructose overfeeding in male subjects (all P < 0.05) but were not significantly altered in female subjects. Fasting plasma free fatty acids and lipid oxidation were inhibited by fructose in male but not in female subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Short-term fructose overfeeding produces hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic insulin resistance in men, but these effects are markedly blunted in healthy young women.

PMID:
18332156
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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