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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Jan;12(1):44-50. doi: 10.1017/S1368980008001912. Epub 2008 Mar 7.

Changes in the sensation of hunger and well-being before and after meals in overweight/obese women following two types of hypoenergetic diet.

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  • 1Departamento de Nutrición, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid, Spain. elerodri@farm.ucm.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse changes in the sensation of hunger and the sensation of well-being of young overweight/obese women following two hypoenergetic diets.

DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS:

Fifty-seven women (BMI = 24-35 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to one of two hypoenergetic diets: diet V, in which the consumption of vegetables was increased; or diet C, in which the consumption of cereals (especially breakfast cereals) was increased. Dietetic and anthropometric data and an evaluation of the sensation of hunger and well-being were collected at the start and end of the study, 6 weeks later.

RESULTS:

The diets led to a reduction in weight and BMI in both groups. The sensation of hunger at the end of meals was higher at the end of the study than at the start in both groups. At 6 weeks, the sensation of well-being after breakfast, morning snack and lunch, as well as the mean sensation of well-being after all meals, was greater in diet C. Compared with that recorded at the beginning of the study, the capacity to experience satiety at the end of meals also increased with diet C, as did the capacity to experience well-being at 6 weeks (for breakfast, lunch, dinner and for the mean for all meals). This capacity to experience well-being was also greater in diet C than in diet V with respect to the mid-morning snack and lunch.

CONCLUSION:

The more positive results obtained with diet C may contribute to the increased weight loss seen in that group and their lower withdrawal rate.

PMID:
18325135
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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