Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Fertil Steril. 2008 Feb;89(2 Suppl):e73-9. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.12.035.

Link between low-dose environmentally relevant cadmium exposures and asthenozoospermia in a rat model.

Author information

  • 1Fertility Research Laboratories, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York 11030, USA. Sbenoff@nshs.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To define the mechanism(s) underlying an association between asthenozoospermia and elevated blood, seminal plasma, and testicular cadmium levels in infertile human males using a rat model of environmentally relevant cadmium exposures.

SETTING:

University medical center andrology research laboratory.

ANIMAL(S):

Male Wistar rats (n = 60), documented to be sensitive to the testicular effects of cadmium.

INTERVENTION(S):

Rats were given ad libitum access to water supplemented with 14% sucrose and 0 mg/L, 5 mg/L, 50 mg/L, or 100 mg/L cadmium for 1, 4, or 8 weeks beginning at puberty.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Testicular cadmium levels were determined by atomic absorption, cauda epididymal sperm motility by visual inspection, and testicular gene expression by DNA microarray hybridization.

RESULT(S):

Chronic, low-dose cadmium exposures produced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. Transcription of genes regulated by calcium and expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel mRNA splicing variants were altered by cadmium exposure. Expression of calcium binding proteins involved in modulation of sperm motility was unaffected.

CONCLUSION(S):

A causal relationship between elevated testicular cadmium and asthenozoospermia was identified. Aberrrant sperm motility was correlated with altered expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel isoforms found on the sperm tail, which regulate calcium and cadmium influx.

PMID:
18308070
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2567823
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk