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Sex Transm Infect. 2008 Jun;84(3):192-4. doi: 10.1136/sti.2007.028126. Epub 2008 Feb 27.

Risk behaviour, healthcare access and prevalence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a population-based sample of adults in Barbados.

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  • 1Family Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine and Research, The University of the West Indies, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Martindales road, Barbados. padams@uwichill.edu.bb

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To estimate the prevalence of urogenital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in people 18 to 35 years of age in Barbados, and to examine factors associated with infection.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional survey of randomly selected people from the voters' register of one electoral district and the collection of urine samples for testing by PCR.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 82%; 408 people (195 males and 213 females) completed a questionnaire and had their urine collected. 397 urine samples were satisfactorily tested. Prevalence of C trachomatis urogenital infection was 11.3% (95% CI +/-2.9) and N gonorrhoeae 1.8% (95% CI +/-1.2) with 12.6% (95% CI +/-3.1) having either or both infections. The difference in prevalence by gender was not significant. Multivariate logistic regression showed that prevalence of C trachomatis and/or N gonorrhoeae decreased with increasing age (per year OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.96, p = 0.001), and decreasing time (</=6 months vs >6 months) since last medical consultation (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.88, p = 0.02). Most (76%) infected people were asymptomatic. Condom use at last intercourse with a partner not being lived with was not protective (reported by 52%, p = 0.617). The usual source of health care was evenly distributed between the public and private sectors and was not associated with infection. Only 30% of people had ever heard of chlamydia, whereas 92% were aware of gonorrhoea.

CONCLUSIONS:

Asymptomatic infection with C trachomatis is an important reservoir of infection, which will remain undetected unless physicians and young people are made aware of this and screening is introduced.

PMID:
18305122
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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