Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychooncology. 2008 Oct;17(10):1014-23. doi: 10.1002/pon.1327.

Change in self-efficacy partially mediates the effects of the FRESH START intervention on cancer survivors' dietary outcomes.

Author information

  • 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, New York, NY 10022, USA. mosherc@mskcc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined change in self-efficacy as a mediator of the effects of a mailed print intervention on the dietary and exercise practices of newly diagnosed breast and prostate cancer survivors.

METHOD:

A total of 543 breast and prostate cancer patients were recruited from 39 states and two provinces within North America. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a 10-month program of tailored mailed print materials that aimed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption, reduce fat intake, and/or increase exercise or a 10-month program of publically available materials on diet and exercise. Telephone surveys conducted at baseline and 1 year assessed dietary practices, physical activity, and self-efficacy for engaging in these health behaviors.

RESULTS:

Results indicated that changes in self-efficacy for fat restriction and eating more fruits and vegetables were significant mediators of the intervention's effects on dietary outcomes at 1-year follow-up. The intervention did not significantly affect self-efficacy for exercise; however, a significant, positive relationship was found between self-efficacy for exercise and exercise duration at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings are largely consistent with Social Cognitive Theory and support the use of strategies to increase self-efficacy in health promotion interventions for cancer survivors.

Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID:
18300337
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3641189
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk