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Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Mar 15;46 Suppl 3:S204-11. doi: 10.1086/524743.

Public health surveillance for suspected smallpox in the United States, 2003-2005: results of a national survey.

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  • 1National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. ssh1@cdc.gov

Abstract

In 2005, a Web-based survey of chief epidemiologists of 50 states, the District of Columbia, 9 large cities, and 8 territories examined the status of US smallpox surveillance after the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommended that smallpox be reportable. Of 55 respondents, 95% reported state or territory laws or regulations governing smallpox reporting; 70% of states required laboratories to report variola virus. All respondents could investigate reported suspected patients; 70%-89% would investigate initially by telephone or fax. In 2004, 11 states reported 33 patients suspected of having smallpox. Reports were more likely in states that provided >/=2 educational and training sessions (67% vs. 21%; prevalence odds ratio, 7.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-60.45). The goal is a public health surveillance system in which all states, cities, and territories can detect and manage suspected smallpox cases urgently and in which overall surveillance for other infectious diseases is strengthened.

PMID:
18284360
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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