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Biosens Bioelectron. 2008 May 15;23(10):1503-11. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2008.01.006. Epub 2008 Jan 16.

Non-Faradaic electrochemical detection of protein interactions by integrated neuromorphic CMOS sensors.

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  • 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University Ithaca, 323 Phillips Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA. bcj7@cornell.edu

Abstract

Electronic detection of the binding event between biotinylated bovine serum albumen (BSA) and streptavidin is demonstrated with the chemoreceptive neuron MOS (CnuMOS) device. Differing from the ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFET), CnuMOS, with the potential of the extended floating gate determined by both the sensing and control gates in a neuromorphic style, can provide protein detection without requiring analyte reference electrodes. In comparison with the microelectrode arrays, measurements are gathered through purely capacitive, non-Faradaic interactions across insulating interfaces. By using a (3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (3-GPS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a simple covalent link for attaching proteins to a silicon dioxide sensing surface, a fully integrated, electrochemical detection platform is realized for protein interactions through monotone large-signal measurements or small-signal impedance spectroscopy. Calibration curves were created to coordinate the sensor response with ellipsometric measurements taken on witness samples. By monitoring the film thickness of streptavidin capture, a sensitivity of 25ng/cm2 or 2A of film thickness was demonstrated. With an improved noise floor the sensor can detect down to 2ng/(cm2mV) based on the calibration curve. AC measurements are shown to significantly reduce long-term sensor drift. Finally, a noise analysis of electrochemical data indicates 1/f(alpha) behavior with a noise floor beginning at approximately 1Hz.

PMID:
18281208
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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