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J Pediatr. 2008 Mar;152(3):383-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.044. Epub 2007 Oct 22.

Circumcision and risk of sexually transmitted infections in a birth cohort.

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  • 1Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the impact of early childhood circumcision on sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition to age 32 years.

STUDY DESIGN:

The circumcision status of a cohort of children born in 1972 and 1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand was sought at age 3 years. Information about STIs was obtained at ages 21, 26, and 32 years. The incidence rates of STI acquisition were calculated, taking into account timing of first sex, and comparisons were made between the circumcised men and uncircumcised men. Adjustments were made for potential socioeconomic and sexual behavior confounding factors where appropriate.

RESULTS:

Of the 499 men studied, 201 (40.3%) had been circumcised by age 3 years. The circumcised and uncircumcised groups differed little in socioeconomic characteristics and sexual behavior. Overall, up to age 32 years, the incidence rates for all STIs were not statistically significantly different-23.4 and 24.4 per 1000 person-years for the uncircumcised and circumcised men, respectively. This was not affected by adjusting for any of the socioeconomic or sexual behavior characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings are consistent with recent population-based cross-sectional studies in developed countries, which found that early childhood circumcision does not markedly reduce the risk of the common STIs in the general population in such countries.

Comment in

PMID:
18280846
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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