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Mol Cancer. 2008 Feb 12;7:19. doi: 10.1186/1476-4598-7-19.

Small interfering RNA targeting CDC25B inhibits liver tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

  • 1Asian Liver Center, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. xryan@stanford.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Using gene expression profiling, we previously identified CDC25B to be significantly highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to non-tumor liver. CDC25B is a cell cycle-activating phosphatase that positively regulates the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases, and is over-expressed in a variety of human malignancies. In this study, we validated the over-expression of CDC25B in HCC, and further investigated its potential as a therapeutic target for the management of HCC.

RESULTS:

Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining of patient samples confirmed the significant over-expression of CDC25B in HCC compared to non-tumor liver samples (P < 0.001). Thus, intefering with the expression and activity of CDC25B may be a potential way to intervene with HCC progression. We used RNA interference to study the biological effects of silencing CDC25B expression in HCC cell lines (Hep3B and Hep40), in order to validate its potential as a therapeutic target. Using small oligo siRNAs targeting the coding region of CDC25B, we effectively suppressed CDC25B expression by up to 90%. This was associatetd with significant reductions in cell growth rate, cell migration and invasion through the matrigel membrane, and caused significant cell cycle delay at the G2 phase. Finally, suppression of CDC25B significantly slowed the growth of Hep40 xenografts in nude mice.

CONCLUSION:

Our data provide evidence that the inhibition of CDC25B expression and activity lead to suppression of tumor cell growth and motility, and may therefore be a feasible approach in the clinical management of HCC.

PMID:
18269767
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2276234
Free PMC Article
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