Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2008 Jan;37(1):3-8.

Clinical skills in final-year medical students: the relationship between self-reported confidence and direct observation by faculty or residents.

Author information

  • 1School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC. chenwalt@yahoo.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Many students, while performing clinical skills such as medical interviewing/ communication, physical examination, and procedural tasks, have never been observed by faculty members or residents. This study aimed to explore the relationships between final-year medical students' self-reported confidence and the frequency of direct observation by faculty member or resident while conducting these clinical skills.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Medical students at China Medical University in Taiwan participated in the survey. Before graduating, they were asked to answer a questionnaire about (1) their confidence in performing 17 clinical skills including medical interviewing/communication, physical examination, and procedural tasks, and (2) the number of times they had been directly observed by faculty members or residents during student-patient encounters.

RESULTS:

Many students reported never having been observed by a faculty member while they performed history taking/communication (46% to 84%), physical examination (36% to 42%), or procedural tasks (41% to 81%). It was found that residents had observed the students more frequently than the faculty members. The correlations between self-reported confidence and the corresponded direct observation were small to medium but significant. However, no difference was found between observation by a faculty member and by a resident.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study confirmed that many medical students have not been directly observed in clinical training; and that those who were observed more often, expressed more self-reported confidence. Some assessment measures, which focus on direct observation and feedback during student-patient encounters, may improve the students' confidence.

PMID:
18265890
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Annals, Academy of Medicine, Singapore
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk