Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Mol Biol. 2008 Mar 21;377(2):395-409. doi: 10.1016/j.jmb.2007.12.073. Epub 2008 Jan 5.

Mapping the cofilin binding site on yeast G-actin by chemical cross-linking.

Author information

  • 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California-Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Cofilin is a major cytoskeletal protein that binds to both monomeric actin (G-actin) and polymeric actin (F-actin) and is involved in microfilament dynamics. Although an atomic structure of the G-actin-cofilin complex does not exist, models of the complex have been built using molecular dynamics simulations, structural homology considerations, and synchrotron radiolytic footprinting data. The hydrophobic cleft between actin subdomains 1 and 3 and, alternatively, the cleft between actin subdomains 1 and 2 have been proposed as possible high-affinity cofilin binding sites. In this study, the proposed binding of cofilin to the subdomain 1/subdomain 3 region on G-actin has been probed using site-directed mutagenesis, fluorescence labeling, and chemical cross-linking, with yeast actin mutants containing single reactive cysteines in the actin hydrophobic cleft and with cofilin mutants carrying reactive cysteines in the regions predicted to bind to G-actin. Mass spectrometry analysis of the cross-linked complex revealed that cysteine 345 in subdomain 1 of mutant G-actin was cross-linked to native cysteine 62 on cofilin. A cofilin mutant that carried a cysteine substitution in the alpha 3-helix (residue 95) formed a cross-link with residue 144 in actin subdomain 3. Distance constraints imposed by these cross-links provide experimental evidence for cofilin binding between actin subdomains 1 and 3 and fit a corresponding docking-based structure of the complex. The cross-linking of the N-terminal region of recombinant yeast cofilin to actin residues 346 and 374 with dithio-bis-maleimidoethane (12.4 A) and via disulfide bond formation was also documented. This set of cross-linking data confirms the important role of the N-terminal segment of cofilin in interactions with G-actin.

PMID:
18258262
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3052258
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (9)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk