Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008 Jan 23;(1):CD006061. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006061.pub2.

Whole grain foods for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Author information

  • 1University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG), Department of Medical Biomics, Laboratory Nutrition and Metabolism, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, Building 3215 4th floor, Groningen, Netherlands, 9713 AV. M.G.Priebe@med.umcg.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diet as one aspect of lifestyle is thought to be one of the modifiable risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Information is needed as to which components of the diet could be protective for this disease.

OBJECTIVES:

To asses the effects of whole-grain foods for the prevention of T2DM.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We selected cohort studies with a minimum duration of five years that assessed the association between intake of whole-grain foods or cereal fibre and incidence of T2DM. Randomised controlled trials lasting at least six weeks were selected that assessed the effect of a diet rich in whole-grain foods compared to a diet rich in refined grain foods on T2DM and its major risk factors.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two authors independently selected the studies, assessed study quality and extracted data. Data of studies were not pooled because of methodological diversity.

MAIN RESULTS:

One randomised controlled trial and eleven prospective cohort studies were identified. The randomised controlled trial, which was of low methodological quality, reported the change in insulin sensitivity in 12 obese hyperinsulinemic participants after six-week long interventions. Intake of whole grain foods resulted in a slight improvement of insulin sensitivity and no adverse effects. Patient satisfaction, health related quality of life, total mortality and morbidity was not reported. Four of the eleven cohort studies measured cereal fibre intake, three studies whole grain intake and two studies both. Two studies measured the change in whole grain food intake and one of them also change in cereal fibre intake. The incidence of T2DM was assessed in nine studies and changes in weight gain in two studies. The prospective studies consistently showed a reduced risk for high intake of whole grain foods (27% to 30%) or cereal fibre (28% to 37%) on the development of T2DM.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

The evidence from only prospective cohort trials is considered to be too weak to be able to draw a definite conclusion about the preventive effect of whole grain foods on the development of T2DM. Properly designed long-term randomised controlled trials are needed. To facilitate this, further mechanistic research should focus on finding a set of relevant intermediate endpoints for T2DM and on identifying genetic subgroups of the population at risk that are most susceptible to dietary intervention.

PMID:
18254091
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk