Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Bacteriol. 2008 Apr;190(7):2266-74. doi: 10.1128/JB.01841-07. Epub 2008 Feb 1.

Elucidation of an alternate isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

Author information

  • 1Department of Microbiology, 203N Morrill Science Center IVN, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. crisso@microbio.umass.edu

Abstract

The central metabolic model for Geobacter sulfurreducens included a single pathway for the biosynthesis of isoleucine that was analogous to that of Escherichia coli, in which the isoleucine precursor 2-oxobutanoate is generated from threonine. 13C labeling studies performed in G. sulfurreducens indicated that this pathway accounted for a minor fraction of isoleucine biosynthesis and that the majority of isoleucine was instead derived from acetyl-coenzyme A and pyruvate, possibly via the citramalate pathway. Genes encoding citramalate synthase (GSU1798), which catalyzes the first dedicated step in the citramalate pathway, and threonine ammonia-lyase (GSU0486), which catalyzes the conversion of threonine to 2-oxobutanoate, were identified and knocked out. Mutants lacking both of these enzymes were auxotrophs for isoleucine, whereas single mutants were capable of growth in the absence of isoleucine. Biochemical characterization of the single mutants revealed deficiencies in citramalate synthase and threonine ammonia-lyase activity. Thus, in G. sulfurreducens, 2-oxobutanoate can be synthesized either from citramalate or threonine, with the former being the main pathway for isoleucine biosynthesis. The citramalate synthase of G. sulfurreducens constitutes the first characterized member of a phylogenetically distinct clade of citramalate synthases, which contains representatives from a wide variety of microorganisms.

PMID:
18245290
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2293191
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk