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Am Heart J. 2008 Feb;155(2):267-73. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2007.10.013. Epub 2007 Dec 19.

Impact of the New York State Cardiac Surgery and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Reporting System on the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock.

Author information

  • 1Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, The Leon H. Charney Department of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies suggest that the New York State Cardiac Surgery and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Reporting System, which makes public the operator-specific mortality for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), may deter operators from providing revascularization to high-risk cardiac patients in New York compared to other states.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective analysis of 545 US patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock due to predominant left ventricular failure enrolled in the SHOCK Registry. Adjusting for case mix using a propensity score method, we compared the use of coronary angiography, PCI, CABG, and outcomes between 220 patients in New York and 325 in other states.

RESULTS:

New York patients were older with similar or less severe baseline characteristics. After propensity score adjustment, New York patients were less likely than non-New York patients to undergo coronary angiography (odds ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.31-0.68, P < .001) and PCI (odds ratio 0.51, 95% CI 0.33-0.77, P = .002). Coronary artery bypass graft rates were similarly low (14.1% vs 15.1%, P = not significant), but New York patients waited significantly longer after shock onset for surgery (101.2 vs 10.3 hours, P < .001) with only 32.3% of New York patients vs 75.5% of non-New York patients (P < .001) taken for CABG within 3 days of shock onset.

CONCLUSIONS:

In our propensity-adjusted retrospective analysis, New York patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock were less likely to undergo coronary angiography and PCI and waited significantly longer to receive CABG than their non-New York counterparts. These findings suggest that state-required reporting to the New York State Cardiac Surgery and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Reporting System may result in the reluctance to revascularize the highest-risk cardiac patients.

PMID:
18215596
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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