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Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Mar;18(3):222-9. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.10.007. Epub 2008 Jan 16.

Prevalence, treatment, and control of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

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  • 1Department of Medicine and the Research Centre of Heart, Brain, Hormone and Healthy Ageing, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to examine the trends in prevalence, treatment, and control of diagnosed diabetes in United States adults 20 years of age or older.

METHODS:

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 were used. Glycemic, blood pressure, and total cholesterol target levels were defined as having glycosylated hemoglobin <7.0%, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, and total cholesterol <200 mg/dL, respectively.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8% in 2003-2004 and increased significantly in people aged 40-59 years, women, non-Hispanic whites, and obese people in the period 1999-2004. Although there was no significant change in the pattern of antidiabetic treatment, the age-adjusted percentage of people with diagnosed diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure target levels increased from 35.8% to 57.1% (p = 0.002) and from 35.7% to 48.3% (p = 0.04), respectively. However, there were only insignificant increases in percentages of those persons achieving total cholesterol target level (from 48.8% to 50.4%) and those achieving all 3 target levels (from 7.5% to 13.2%).

CONCLUSIONS:

In 1999-2004, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased significantly in some subgroups of the population. However, the increases in percentages of people with diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure targets are encouraging, although there is room for improvement.

PMID:
18201902
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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