Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Jan;30(1):59-66.

Obstetrics and gynaecology residents' self-rated knowledge, motivation, skill, and practice patterns in counselling for contraception, STI prevention, sexual dysfunction, and intimate partner violence and sexual coercion.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Western Ontario, London ON.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This research provides an initial exploration of obstetrics and gynaecology residents' self-rated knowledge base, motivation to practise, skills, and practice patterns with respect to patient counselling concerning contraception, prevention of sexually transmitted infection (STI), sexual dysfunction, and intimate partner violence and sexual coercion.

METHODS:

Obstetrics and gynaecology residents (N = 27) at all levels of training at four Ontario postgraduate programs completed self-reports of knowledge, motivation, skills, and practice patterns for counselling concerning four focal issues in women's sexual and reproductive health.

RESULTS:

Obstetrics and gynaecology residents generally possessed a sound knowledge base in the areas under study, but significant gaps were observed in their knowledge of condom use, abortion, sexual dysfunction, and intimate partner violence and sexual coercion. Residents were well-motivated to provide counselling in these areas, and, with the exceptions of counselling concerning sexual dysfunction and intimate partner violence and sexual coercion, felt that they were well trained to do so. Participants, however, consistently perceived only modest levels of support from their peers and from consultants with respect to counselling in the domains of contraceptive choice and adherence, STI prevention, sexual dysfunction, and intimate partner violence and sexual coercion.

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest the need to review instruction and support for obstetrics and gynaecology resident training in patient counselling in important but clinically neglected areas of women's sexual and reproductive health.

PMID:
18198070
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk