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Neurology. 2008 Jan 15;70(3):226-30. doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000296827.20167.98.

The hypocretin neurotransmission system in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

Author information

  • 1University of Rochester, Department of Neurology, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 673, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. Emma_Ciafaloni@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) frequently have symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Some patients with DM1 show sleep-onset REM, similar to that observed in narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is characterized by impaired hypocretin (Hcrt) neurotransmission.

OBJECTIVE:

To test for dysregulation of Hcrt neurotransmission in a prospective cohort of patients with DM1.

METHODS:

Hcrt levels in CSF were measured by radioimmunoassay. Sleep physiology was assessed by overnight polysomnography (PSG) and a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Splicing of Hcrt receptor 1 and 2 (HcrtR1 and HcrtR2) mRNA was examined in postmortem samples of temporal cortex.

RESULTS:

Seventeen of 38 patients with DM1 reported symptoms of EDS. Among patients with DM1 with EDS who underwent PSG/MSLT, 7 of 13 showed reduced sleep latency, sleep-onset REM, or both. However, CSF Hcrt levels in DM1 (mean 277 pg/mL, n = 38) were not different from controls (mean 277 pg/mL, n = 33). Also, splicing of HcrtR1 and HcrtR2 mRNA in patients with DM1 was similar to controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Excessive daytime sleepiness and dysregulation of REM sleep occur frequently in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). However, the pathophysiologic basis is distinct from narcolepsy, as patients with DM1 do not have a consistent defect of Hcrt release or receptor splicing.

PMID:
18195268
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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