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Arch Ophthalmol. 2008 Jan;126(1):102-9. doi: 10.1001/archopht.126.1.102.

Dietary carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and risk of cataract in women: a prospective study.

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  • 1Divisions of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215-1204, USA. wchristen@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine in prospective data the relation between dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamins C and E and the risk of cataract in women.

DESIGN:

Dietary intake was assessed at baseline in 39,876 female health professionals by using a detailed food frequency questionnaire. A total of 35,551 women provided detailed information on antioxidant nutrient intake from food and supplements and were free of a diagnosis of cataract. The main outcome measure was cataract, defined as an incident, age-related lens opacity responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity in the worse eye to 20/30 or worse based on self-report confirmed by medical record review.

RESULTS:

A total of 2031 cases of incident cataract were confirmed during a mean of 10 years of follow-up. Comparing women in the extreme quintiles, the multivariate relative risk of cataract was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.95; test for trend, P = .04) for lutein/zeaxanthin and 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.00; test for trend, P = .03) for vitamin E from food and supplements.

CONCLUSION:

In these prospective observational data from a large cohort of female health professionals, higher dietary intakes of lutein/zeaxanthin and vitamin E from food and supplements were associated with significantly decreased risks of cataract.

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PMID:
18195226
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2396535
Free PMC Article
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