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J Biol Chem. 2008 Mar 28;283(13):8340-50. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M707751200. Epub 2008 Jan 11.

Detergent-insoluble aggregates associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in transgenic mice contain primarily full-length, unmodified superoxide dismutase-1.

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  • 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Determining the composition of aggregated superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) species associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), especially with respect to co-aggregated proteins and post-translational modifications, could identify cellular or biochemical factors involved in the formation of these aggregates and explain their apparent neurotoxicity. The results of mass spectrometric and shotgun-proteomic analyses of SOD1-containing aggregates isolated from spinal cords of symptomatic transgenic ALS mice using two different isolation strategies are presented, including 1) resistance to detergent extraction and 2) size exclusion-coupled anti-SOD1 immunoaffinity chromatography. Forty-eight spinal cords from three different ALS-SOD1 mutant mice were analyzed, namely G93A, G37R, and the unnatural double mutant H46R/H48Q. The analysis consistently revealed that the most abundant proteins recovered from aggregate species were full-length unmodified SOD1 polypeptides. Although aggregates from some spinal cord samples contained trace levels of highly abundant proteins, such as vimentin and neurofilament-3, no proteins were consistently found to co-purify with mutant SOD1 in stoichiometric quantities. The results demonstrate that the principal protein in the high molecular mass aggregates whose appearance correlates with symptoms of the disease is the unmodified, full-length SOD1 polypeptide.

PMID:
18192269
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2276386
Free PMC Article

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