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Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan;82(1):199-207. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.09.011.

Disruption of neurexin 1 associated with autism spectrum disorder.

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  • 1Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research and Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of complex etiology in which genetic factors play a major role. We have implicated the neurexin 1 (NRXN1) gene in two independent subjects who display an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in association with a balanced chromosomal abnormality involving 2p16.3. In the first, with karyotype 46,XX,ins(16;2)(q22.1;p16.1p16.3)pat, NRXN1 is directly disrupted within intron 5. Importantly, the father possesses the same chromosomal abnormality in the absence of ASD, indicating that the interruption of alpha-NRXN1 is not fully penetrant and must interact with other factors to produce ASD. The breakpoint in the second subject, with 46,XY,t(1;2)(q31.3;p16.3)dn, occurs approximately 750 kb 5' to NRXN1 within a 2.6 Mb genomic segment that harbors no currently annotated genes. A scan of the NRXN1 coding sequence in a cohort of ASD subjects, relative to non-ASD controls, revealed that amino acid alterations in neurexin 1 are not present at high frequency in ASD. However, a number of rare sequence variants in the coding region, including two missense changes in conserved residues of the alpha-neurexin 1 leader sequence and of an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, respectively, suggest that even subtle changes in NRXN1 might contribute to susceptibility to ASD.

PMID:
18179900
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2253961
Free PMC Article

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