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Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan;82(1):10-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.12.001.

Canine behavioral genetics: pointing out the phenotypes and herding up the genes.

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  • 1National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

An astonishing amount of behavioral variation is captured within the more than 350 breeds of dog recognized worldwide. Inherent in observations of dog behavior is the notion that much of what is observed is breed specific and will persist, even in the absence of training or motivation. Thus, herding, pointing, tracking, hunting, and so forth are likely to be controlled, at least in part, at the genetic level. Recent studies in canine genetics suggest that small numbers of genes control major morphologic phenotypes. By extension, we hypothesize that at least some canine behaviors will also be controlled by small numbers of genes that can be readily mapped. In this review, we describe our current understanding of a representative subset of canine behaviors, as well as approaches for phenotyping, genome-wide scans, and data analysis. Finally, we discuss the applicability of studies of canine behavior to human genetics.

PMID:
18179880
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2253978
Free PMC Article
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