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J Athl Train. 2007 Oct-Dec;42(4):524-9.

Transient electric changes immediately after surgical trauma.

Author information

  • 1Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Electric stimulation is frequently used to promote soft tissue healing, although we do not have a complete understanding of the tissue's electromagnetic properties.

OBJECTIVE:

To measure the transient electric changes in skin and muscle tissue immediately after trauma.

DESIGN:

1-group time series.

SETTING:

Climate-controlled operating room in a public urban hospital.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Eleven participants (8 females, 3 males) with a mean age of 65.18 +/- 11.36 years undergoing total hip arthroplasty.

INTERVENTION(S):

An incision approximately 10 cm distal to the posterior superior iliac spine extended distally over the greater trochanter and along the lateral limb. The incision was completed in 2 cuts: (1) skin and subcutaneous fat and (2) muscle tissue.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Three measurement sessions were performed with an electrometer before and after a skin incision and after a muscle incision. Potential differences and current intensity were measured immediately after acute trauma to determine the transient electric changes associated with soft tissue injury.

RESULTS:

The electric potentials were significantly more negative after the skin incision (P = .036) and skin plus muscle incision (P = .008; preincision = 0.001 +/- 0.015 V, skin incision = -0.127 +/- 0.134 V, skin plus muscle incision = -0.192 +/- 0.153 V). Current intensity changed significantly after the skin plus muscle incision (P = .008; preincision = 0.046 +/- 0.112 pA, skin incision = -0.803 +/- 0.904 pA, skin plus muscle incision = -1.708 +/- 1.302 pA).

CONCLUSIONS:

Soft tissue trauma generated negative transient electric changes.

KEYWORDS:

electric stimulation; injury; muscle

PMID:
18174941
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2140079
Free PMC Article

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