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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2008 Jan;49(1):163-7. doi: 10.1167/iovs.07-1005.

Effect of amniotic membrane transplantation on the healing of bacterial keratitis.

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  • 1Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, 52621 Tel-Hashomer, Israel. ibarequet@hotmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study, with the use of an animal model, the efficacy of amniotic membrane (AM) transplantation as adjunctive treatment in corneal healing after bacterial keratitis.

METHODS:

Staphylococcus aureus keratitis was induced in 47 rats by injection of bacteria into the corneal stroma. Treatment was started 48 hours later with one of three randomly assigned protocols: cefazolin drops (50 mg/mL) and AM transplantation (n = 16); nonpreserved 0.9% saline drops and AM transplantation (n = 15); or cefazolin without AM transplantation (n = 16). Cefazolin and saline drops were administered every 30 minutes for 6 hours, then hourly for 6 hours. AM was transplanted 24 hours after termination of cefazolin or saline treatment. Results were clinically assessed 7 days after AM transplantation or at the corresponding time in the nontransplanted animals. The rats were then killed, and their corneas were removed for bacterial counts or histopathologic examination.

RESULTS:

The best clinical results were observed in the group treated with cefazolin and AM transplantation, manifested by the least corneal haze and neovascularization (P = 0.007 and P = 0.014, respectively) and minimal bacterial counts (28 colony-forming units [CFU]/mL compared with 160 CFU/mL and 240 CFU/mL, respectively). Histopathologic examination showed that the central corneal vessels from rats treated with cefazolin and AM were smaller and less congested than those from the other two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

AM transplantation is a useful adjunctive treatment after bacterial keratitis in this rat model. The transplanted AM improved the healing process, resulting in decreased corneal haze and less neovascularization.

PMID:
18172088
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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