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Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):331-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.11.011. Epub 2007 Dec 3.

Children's fruit and vegetable intake: associations with the neighbourhood food environment.

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  • 1Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine associations between availability of different types of food outlets and children's fruit and vegetable intake.

METHOD:

Parents of 340 5-6 and 461 10-12 year-old Australian children reported how frequently their child ate 14 fruits and 13 vegetables in the last week in 2002/3. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to determine the availability of the following types of food outlets near home: greengrocers; supermarkets; convenience stores; fast food outlets; restaurants, caf├ęs and takeaway outlets. Logistic regression analyses examined the likelihood of consuming fruit >or=2 times/day and vegetables >or=3 times/day, according to access to food outlets.

RESULTS:

Overall, 62.5% of children ate fruit >or=2 times/day and 46.4% ate vegetables >or=3 times/day. The more fast food outlets (OR=0.82, 95%CI=0.67-0.99) and convenience stores (OR=0.84, 95%CI=0.73-0.98) close to home, the lower the likelihood of consuming fruit >or=2 times/day. There was also an inverse association between density of convenience stores and the likelihood of consuming vegetables >or=3 times/day (OR=0.84, 95%CI=0.74-0.95). The likelihood of consuming vegetables >or=3 times/day was greater the farther children lived from a supermarket (OR=1.27, 95%CI=1.07-1.51) or a fast food outlet (OR=1.19, 95%CI=1.06-1.35).

CONCLUSION:

Availability of fast food outlets and convenience stores close to home may have a negative effect on children's fruit and vegetable intake.

PMID:
18164753
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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