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J Biol Chem. 2008 Feb 22;283(8):4730-43. Epub 2007 Dec 21.

Proteomic analysis of a nutritional shift-up in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies Gvp36 as a BAR-containing protein involved in vesicular traffic and nutritional adaptation.

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  • 1Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano, Italy.

Abstract

Yeast cells undergoing a nutritional shift-up from a poor to a rich carbon source take several hours to adapt to the novel, richer carbon source. The budding index is a physiologically relevant "global" parameter that reflects the complex links between cell growth and division that are both coordinately and deeply affected by nutritional conditions. We used changes in budding index as a guide to choose appropriate, relevant time points during an ethanol to glucose nutritional shift-up for preparation of samples for the analysis of proteome by two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry. About 600 spots were detected. 90 spots, mostly comprising proteins involved in intermediary metabolism, protein synthesis, and response to stress, showed differential expression after glucose addition. Among modulated proteins we identified a protein of previously unknown function, Gvp36, showing a transitory increase corresponding to the drop of the fraction of budded cells. A gvp36Delta strain shares several phenotypes (including general growth defects, heat shock, and high salt sensitivity, defects in polarization of the actin cytoskeleton, in endocytosis and in vacuolar biogenesis, defects in entering stationary phase upon nutrient starvation) with secretory pathway mutants and with mutants in genes encoding the two previously known yeast BAR proteins (RSV161 and RSV167). We thus propose that Gvp36 represents a novel yeast BAR protein involved in vesicular traffic and in nutritional adaptation.

PMID:
18156177
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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