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Transplant Proc. 2007 Dec;39(10):3225-7.

Survival analysis of obese patients undergoing liver transplantation.

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  • 1Unit of Liver Transplantation, Faculty of Medical Science, Campinas, Brazil. ilkaboin@yahoo.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The influence of preoperative obesity in liver transplanted patients remains undetermined.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the survival of obese patients undergoing liver transplantation.

METHODS:

We calculated the body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) of 244 liver transplantation patients. All transplantations were performed from September 1991 to December 2006. The patients were divided according to the BMI values: nonobese (NO) patients (BMI<30) and obese (O) patients (BMI>30). Pre- and postoperative data were used. The following statistical tests were employed: Student's t test, Kaplan-Meier survival, and Cox-Mantel tests.

RESULTS:

Group O was composed of 38 individuals (15.3%) with BMI of 33.1, and the BMI of NO was 24. Group O showed an average age of 50.1 years and group NO, 45.5 years (P<.05). Group O postoperative creatinine was higher (P=.001). Both groups had similar MELD scores with an average of 17.5+/-5.9. According to the Child-Pugh classification, group NO included 140 (69.6%) B and 61 (30.3%) C patients; group O, 8 (21%) B and 30 (79%) C patients. There were no significant differences between the groups when comparing cold and warm ischemia times, surgical times, intensive care stay, or blood requirements. The actuarial survivals after 1 and 5 years were 61.3% and 51% for group O and 68% and 47% for NO group (P>.05). A Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the survival time in this study was related to red blood cell transfusions, recipient sodium, MELD score, donor sodium, and age. Recipient age was a main factor in multiple regression analysis for obese patients in this study.

CONCLUSION:

There was no significant difference between O and NO for the 1-year and long-term survivals, but older patients displayed lower survival times.

PMID:
18089359
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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