Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2008 May;68(5):716-23. Epub 2007 Dec 7.

The antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid improves endothelial dysfunction induced by acute hyperglycaemia during OGTT in impaired glucose tolerance.

Author information

  • 1Department of Endocrinology, Wuhan General Hospital of Guangzhou Command, Wuhan, Hubei Province, PR China. Guangda64@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is considered a transitional phase in the development of type 2 diabetes, and is also independently associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) represents a very early step in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to examine ED in the fasting state and after a glucose challenge as well as after administration of an antioxidant agent.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

The study subjects included 42 IGT patients and 26 healthy individuals (control group). The IGT patients were randomly divided into two groups, 21 in each group (the alpha-lipoic acid group and the placebo group). In the alpha-lipoic acid group, 300 mg of alpha-lipoic acid was administrated before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); in the placebo group, 250 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride was administrated before the OGTT. In addition, 250 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride was also administrated to the control subjects before the OGTT (control group), and then vascular function was examined in the fasting state and repeated 1 and 2 h after the glucose load. High-resolution ultrasound was used to measure flow-mediated endothelium-dependent arterial dilation (FMD) and glyceryltrinitrate (GTN)-induced endothelium-independent arterial dilation.

RESULTS:

In the fasting state, and at 60 and 120 min, FMD in both the placebo and alpha-lipoic acid groups was significantly lower than in the controls (P < 0.01). In the control group, FMD tended to decrease at 60 min after glucose loading and returned to the baseline levels at 120 min (P > 0.05). In the placebo group, FMD decreased significantly at 60 min after glucose loading (P < 0.01) and increased markedly from 60 to 120 min (P < 0.01). The alpha-lipoic acid-treated patients showed FMD values intermediate between the control subjects and the IGT patients treated with placebo, at both 60 and 120 min, and the differences were significant (P < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, FMD was significantly correlated to fasting blood glucose (FBG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], C-reactive protein (CRP), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and age in IGT patients at baseline (P < 0.01). Spearman's analysis showed a significant negative correlation between FMD and plasma glucose levels, and between FMD and TBARS during the OGTT in IGT patients (placebo group) (P < 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between FMD and plasma glucose levels, and between FMD and TBARS during the OGTT in IGT patients treated with alpha-lipoic acid (P < 0.05), although the power of association decreased.

CONCLUSION:

In subjects with IGT, FMD was impaired both in the fasting state and after a glucose challenge, probably through increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals. The ED observed after a glucose challenge is related to the extent of hyperglycaemia and TBARS, and an antioxidant agent can improve the impairment of endothelial function induced by acute hyperglycaemia.

PMID:
18070144
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk