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Urology. 2007 Nov;70(5):961-4.

Inguinal hernias in men undergoing open radical retropubic prostatectomy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Urology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. Herbert.lepor@med.nyu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the incidence of inguinal hernias in men undergoing open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP).

METHODS:

The incidence of preoperative and postprostatectomy inguinal hernias were determined by a retrospective chart review and questionnaire survey of 1130 consecutive men who underwent open RRP by a single surgeon from October 2000 to October 2005. A preoperative inguinal hernia was diagnosed by the physical examination or abdominal computed tomography findings. The incidence of new postoperative hernias was ascertained by the patients' responses to a survey indicating the development of a new groin bulge or hernia.

RESULTS:

Of the 1130 patients, 146 (13%) had a preoperative inguinal hernia. Increasing age and lower body mass index were significantly associated with the detection of a preoperative inguinal hernia. The sensitivity of detecting an inguinal hernia by physical examination and routine abdominal computed tomography preoperatively was 96.3% and 42.5%, respectively. Also, 8% of men developed a new hernia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although abdominal computed tomography can identify inguinal hernias in men undergoing open RRP, the test's sensitivity is inferior to that of a simple physical examination. All candidates for open RRP should undergo a careful physical examination to identify asymptomatic inguinal hernias. Our findings suggest that the previously reported high incidence of symptomatic inguinal hernias that developed after open RRP can be explained by a failure to diagnose preexisting inguinal hernias and the development of new hernias.

PMID:
18068454
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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