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Public Health Nutr. 2008 Oct;11(10):998-1005. Epub 2007 Dec 7.

Association of antioxidant vitamins and oxidative stress levels in pregnancy with infant growth during the first year of life.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, 911-1 Mok-dong, Yangcheon-Gu, Seoul 158-710, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Whereas there are numerous reports in the literature relating the impact of maternal nutritional status on subsequent birth outcome, much less is known about the long-term impact on infant growth after birth. Therefore, we conducted a prospective cohort study to investigate the association of maternal micronutrient status (vitamins A, C and E, folate) and oxidative stress status in pregnancy with infant growth during the first year of life.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Outpatient clinic of obstetrics, Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Two groups were constructed for this study - the Ewha pregnancy cohort (n = 677) and the infant growth cohort comprising follow-up live newborns of all the recruited pregnant women (n = 317). Maternal serum vitamin and urinary oxidative stress levels were collected and infant weights and heights were measured at birth and at 6 and 12 months after birth.

RESULTS:

Division of the subjects into folate-deficient and normal groups revealed that infant weight and height at 0, 6 and 12 months were adversely affected by folate deficiency. High maternal vitamin C was associated with increased infant weight and height at birth and after birth.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate the importance of preventing folate deficiency and supplementing vitamin C during pregnancy.

PMID:
18062841
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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