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Ann Oncol. 2008 Apr;19(4):641-8. Epub 2007 Dec 4.

Weight change and cancer risk in a cohort of more than 65,000 adults in Austria.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Epidemiology, University of Ulm, Helmholtzstrasse, Germany. kilian.rapp@uni-ulm.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To investigate relations between weight loss or weight gain and the incidence of cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Weight change was assessed in a population-based cohort of >65 000 Austrian adults (28 711 men and 36 938 women) for a period of 7 years, after which participants were followed for incident cancers over 8 years on average. Incident cancers (other than nonmelanoma skin cancers) were ascertained by a population-based cancer registry (n = 3128). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard rate ratios (HRs) stratified by age and adjusted for smoking, occupational group, blood glucose and body mass index at baseline.

RESULTS:

In both men and women, neither weight loss nor weight gain was clearly associated with the incidence of all cancers combined. Weight loss (>0.10 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with colon cancer in men [HR 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.87], while high weight gain (> or =0.50 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (HR 0.43; 95% CI 0.24-0.76). Among women, high weight gain was positively associated with ovarian cancer (HR 2.48; 95% CI 1.05-5.85).

CONCLUSION:

These findings indicate that recent weight change may influence the incidence of several types of cancer.

PMID:
18056917
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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