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Clin Interv Aging. 2006;1(4):403-14.

Sildenafil in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: an overview of the clinical evidence.

Author information

  • 12nd Department of Urology, Papageorgiou General Hospital, and Center for Sexual and Reproductive Health, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. kchatzim@med.auth.gr

Abstract

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a highly prevalent disease associated with aging as well as with several risk factors including hypertension, heart disease, obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypogonadism, drugs-related, and pelvic surgery. Many of these factors are components of the metabolic syndrome, a multiplex risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). ED shares common risk factors with CVD. Endothelial dysfunction seems to be the early underlying pathophysiology across both conditions. The efficacy, tolerability and cardiovascular safety of sildenafil has been evaluated in numerous large, randomized, doubleblind, placebo-controlled clinical studies in the broad population of men with ED including men with several co-morbid conditions. Sildenafil is effective in several specific patient populations including the difficult-to-treat subpopulations such as diabetes mellitus and after radical prostatectomy. It is associated with rapid onset of action--within 14 minutes for some men--and an extended duration of action for up to 12 hours. Sildenafil improves quality of life and satisfaction for treated men and is well tolerated with a favorable safety profile. New data suggest that sildenafil has beneficial effects in several chronic conditions. It has been approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension. Numerous articles have suggested that it improves endothelial function and a possible role on premature ejaculation or treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms has been suggested.

PMID:
18046917
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2699643
Free PMC Article
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