Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Exp Med. 2007 Dec 24;204(13):3183-94. Epub 2007 Nov 26.

Amelioration of epidermal hyperplasia by TNF inhibition is associated with reduced Th17 responses.

Author information

  • 1Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. lzaba@rockefeller.edu

Erratum in

  • J Exp Med. 2008 Aug 4;205(8):1941. Suárez Fariñas, Mayte [corrected to Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte].

Abstract

Biological agents have dramatically improved treatment options for patients with severe psoriasis. Etanercept (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptor-immunoglobulin fusion protein) is an effective treatment for many psoriasis patients, and blockade of TNF is considered to be its primary action. However, in this clinical trial, we show that etanercept has early inhibitory effects on a newly appreciated type of T cells: T helper type 17 (Th17) cells. Etanercept reduced the inflammatory dendritic cell products that drive Th17 cell proliferation (interleukin [IL] 23), as well as Th17 cell products and downstream effector molecules (IL-17, IL-22, CC chemokine ligand 20, and beta-defensin 4). In contrast, Th1 cellular products and effector molecules (interferon gamma, lymphotoxin alpha, and myxovirus resistance 1) were reduced late in disease resolution. This study suggests a role for Th17 in addition to Th1 cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Th17 cells may be particularly important in driving epidermal activation in psoriatic plaques, whereas Th1 cells must also be eliminated for final disease resolution.

PMID:
18039949
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2150965
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (6)Free text

Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk