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AIDS. 2007 Nov;21 Suppl 6:S47-54. doi: 10.1097/01.aids.0000299410.37152.17.

Survival of blood donors and their spouses with HIV-1 subtype E (CRF01 A_E) infection in northern Thailand, 1992-2007.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of PublicHealth, 615N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. kenelson@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the survival patterns among adults in Thailand 8-14 years after HIV-1 subtype E (CRF01 A_E) infection.

DESIGN:

Follow-up for the current vital status of adults who were estimated to have had incident HIV-1 subtype E infection 8-14 years previously.

METHODS:

Data on the survival of a population of HIV-1-infected male blood donors and their seropositive wives was obtained during March-April 2007. These subjects were identified from a subpopulation of 150 individuals whose seroconversion interval was estimated to be less than 2 years and who were enrolled in 1992-1997. National registration, vital records, and death certificates, as appropriate, were obtained and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed for the entire population, for males and females, and for individuals above and equal to or below the median age at infection.

RESULTS:

The vital status was obtained for 138 of 150 subjects (92%). The overall median survival was 8.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.1-9.4] years. The median survival did not differ significantly between men and women or in those above or below the median age.

CONCLUSION:

The median survival of 8.2 years in this population of young adults in Thailand was significantly less than that reported among persons of similar age in high-income countries or in eastern or southern Africa. The survival among individuals in Thailand infected with HIV-1 subtype E appears to be similar to that reported among individuals in Africa infected with HIV-1 subtype D.

PMID:
18032938
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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