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Toxicol Sci. 2008 Mar;102(1):3-14. Epub 2007 Nov 13.

Perfluoroalkyl acids and related chemistries--toxicokinetics and modes of action.

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  • 1The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.

Abstract

The perfluoroalkyl acid salts (both carboxylates and sulfonates, hereafter designated as PFAAs) and their derivatives are important chemicals that have numerous consumer and industrial applications. However, recent discoveries that some of these compounds have global distribution, environmental persistence, presence in humans and wildlife, as well as toxicity in laboratory animal models, have generated considerable scientific, regulatory, and public interest on an international scale. The Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology Symposium, entitled "Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Related Chemistries: Toxicokinetics and Modes-of-Action Workshop" was held February 14-16, 2007 at the Westin Arlington Gateway, Arlington, VA. In addition to the Society of Toxicology, this symposium was sponsored by 3M Company, DuPont, Plastics Europe, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The objectives of this 3-day meeting were to (1) provide an overview of PFAA toxicity and description of recent findings with the sulfonates, carboxylates, and telomer alcohols; (2) address the toxicokinetic profiles of various PFAAs among animal models and humans, and the biological processes that are responsible for these observations; (3) examine the possible modes of action that determine the PFAA toxicities observed in animal models, and their relevance to human health risks; and (4) identify the critical research needs and strategies to fill the existing informational gaps that hamper risk assessment of these chemicals. This report summarizes the discourse that occurred during the symposium.

PMID:
18003598
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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