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J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Oct;49(10):1165-75.

Racial and ethnic disparities in the prevalence and management of cardiovascular risk factors in the United States workforce.

Author information

  • 1Evidence-Based Strategies, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY 10017, USA. robin.hertz@pfizer.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess racial or ethnic differences in workers with respect to awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and to identify factors associated with these disparities.

METHODS:

Analysis of nationally representative data collected from employed persons participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2002, with sub-analyses by race and ethnicity.

RESULTS:

Mexican-American workers are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to be aware of their hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39-0.94) and less likely to be treated (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.23-0.85); less likely to be aware (OR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.33-0.93) and treated (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.14-0.78) for dyslipidemia; and more likely to be aware of diabetes (OR = 3.01; 95% CI = 1.14-7.95). Non-Hispanic blacks treated for hypertension are less likely than whites to reach blood pressure goal (OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.33-0.66). Having a usual place of care is independently associated with awareness and treatment for hypertension, and treatment for dyslipidemia.

CONCLUSION:

Understanding cardiovascular health disparities in the workforce can help employers structure appropriate workplace screening and prevention programs.

PMID:
18000422
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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