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J Biomed Opt. 2007 Sep-Oct;12(5):051604.

Using noninvasive multispectral imaging to quantitatively assess tissue vasculature.

Author information

  • 1National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Laboratory of Integrative and Medical Biophysics, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Abstract

This research describes a noninvasive, noncontact method used to quantitatively analyze the functional characteristics of tissue. Multispectral images collected at several near-infrared wavelengths are input into a mathematical optical skin model that considers the contributions from different analytes in the epidermis and dermis skin layers. Through a reconstruction algorithm, we can quantify the percent of blood in a given area of tissue and the fraction of that blood that is oxygenated. Imaging normal tissue confirms previously reported values for the percent of blood in tissue and the percent of blood that is oxygenated in tissue and surrounding vasculature, for the normal state and when ischemia is induced. This methodology has been applied to assess vascular Kaposi's sarcoma lesions and the surrounding tissue before and during experimental therapies. The multispectral imaging technique has been combined with laser Doppler imaging to gain additional information. Results indicate that these techniques are able to provide quantitative and functional information about tissue changes during experimental drug therapy and investigate progression of disease before changes are visibly apparent, suggesting a potential for them to be used as complementary imaging techniques to clinical assessment.

PMID:
17994873
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2443549
Free PMC Article

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