Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Urol Clin North Am. 2007 Nov;34(4):591-9, vii-viii.

Premature ejaculation: state of the art.

Author information

  • Department of Psychiatry and Neurosexology, HagaHospital Leyenburg, The Hague, The Netherlands. md@waldinger.demon.nl

Abstract

Premature ejaculation (PE) is a frequent male sexual complaint.This occurrence does not automatically imply the existence of a male sexual disorder. The current DSM definition of PE has a low positive predictive value with a high associated risk for false-positive diagnoses of PE. A new classification in four well-defined PE syndromes has recently been proposed for the pending DSM-V. According to this new classification there are different pathophysiologies and treatments of PE, dependent on the underlying PE syndrome. Some types are particularly neurobiologically or medically determined and need drug treatment; other types, which are mainly psychologically determined, need psychotherapy or both drug treatment and psychotherapy. A meta-analysis of all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and clomipramine studies, which were performed according to current standards of evidence-based medicine, demonstrated a similar efficacy for the daily treatment with the serotonergic antidepressants paroxetine hemihydrate, clomipramine, sertraline, and fluoxetine, with paroxetine hemihydrate exerting the strongest effect on ejaculation. On-demand treatment with SSRIs generally exerts much less ejaculation delay than daily SSRI treatment. Other on-demand treatment options are the topical use of anesthetics, tramadol, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Caution is needed with tramadol with regard to its potential addictive properties. There is insufficient evidence for the ejaculation delaying effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and intracavernous injection of vasoactive drugs.

PMID:
17983899
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk