Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
MedGenMed. 2007 May 14;9(2):35.

Health-related quality of life and weight loss practices among overweight and obese US adults, 2003 behavioral risk factor surveillance system.

Author information

  • 1Nutrition and Health Science Program, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Trying to lose weight is a concern for many Americans, but motivation for weight loss is not fully understood. Clinical assessment for obesity treatment is primarily based on measures of body size and physical comorbidities; however, these factors may not be enough to motivate individuals to lose weight. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may have a role in an individual's decision to try to lose weight. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and association of HRQOL measures as independent moderators of weight loss practices among overweight and obese men and women.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Data were from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an annual state-based telephone survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of adults 20 years of age or older with BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m2 (n = 111,456) who responded to 4 standard HRQOL measures that assessed general health status, physical health, mental health, and activity limitation in the past 30 days.

RESULTS:

Among men with BMI 25-34.9 kg/m2, the odds of trying to lose weight increased for the moderate vs best category of HRQOL but not for the poorest vs best category, and no associations were noted for men with BMI > or = 35 kg/m2. Women with BMI 25-34.9 kg/m2 had reduced odds and decreasing associated trends in the prevalence of trying to lose weight with poorer general health, increased physically unhealthy days, and increased activity limitation days. Conversely, women with 1-13 vs 0 mentally unhealthy days had greater odds of trying to lose weight. Among those trying to lose weight, reducing calories was common (52%-69%, men; 56%-69%, women). Among men, with the exception of recent mental health, poorer levels of HRQOL measures were associated with diminished attainment of recommended physical activity levels. Among women, poorer general health status was associated with diminished attainment of recommended physical activity levels.

DISCUSSION:

With the exception of recent mental health, HRQOL was differentially associated with trying to lose weight among men and women. Specifically, moderately poor HRQOL among men and better HRQOL among women were associated with trying to lose weight. Consideration of these influences on weight loss may be useful in the treatment and support of obese patients.

PMID:
17955090
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1994864
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk