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Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 1;45(9):1132-40. Epub 2007 Sep 21.

National trends in Staphylococcus aureus infection rates: impact on economic burden and mortality over a 6-year period (1998-2003).

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  • 1Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. gnoskin@northwestern.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We evaluated historical trends in the Staphylococcus aureus infection rate, economic burden, and mortality in US hospitals from 1998 through 2003.

METHODS:

The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to assess trends over time of S. aureus infection during 1998-2003. Historical trends were determined for 5 strata of hospital stays, including all inpatient stays, surgical procedure stays, invasive cardiovascular surgical stays, invasive orthopedic surgical stays, and invasive neurosurgical stays.

RESULTS:

During the 6-year study period from 1998 through 2003, the rate of S. aureus infection increased significantly for all inpatient stays (from 0.74% to 1.0%; annual percentage change (APC), 7.1%; P=.004), surgical stays (from 0.90% to 1.3%; APC, 7.9%; P=.001), and invasive orthopedic surgical stays (from 1.2% to 1.8%; APC, 9.3%; P<.001). For invasive neurosurgical stays, the rate of S. aureus infection did not change from 1998 to 2000 but increased at an annual rate of 11.0% from 2000 to 2003 (from 1.4% to 1.8%; P=.034). The total economic burden of S. aureus infection for hospitals also increased significantly for all stay types, with the annual percentage increase ranging from 9.2% to 17.9% (P<.05 for all). In 2003, the total economic burden of S. aureus infection was estimated to be $14.5 billion for all inpatient stays and $12.3 billion for surgical patient stays. However, there were significant decreases in the risk of S. aureus-related in-hospital mortality from 1998 to 2003 for all inpatient stays (from 7.1% to 5.6%; APC, -4.6%; P=.001) and for surgical stays (from 7.1% to 5.5%; APC, -4.6%; P=.002).

CONCLUSIONS:

The inpatient S. aureus infection rate and economic burden of S. aureus infections for US hospitals increased substantially from 1998 to 2003, whereas the in-hospital mortality rate decreased.

PMID:
17918074
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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