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Blood. 2008 Jan 1;111(1):251-9. Epub 2007 Oct 1.

A2A receptor signaling promotes peripheral tolerance by inducing T-cell anergy and the generation of adaptive regulatory T cells.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.

Abstract

Tissue-derived adenosine, acting via the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R), is emerging as an important negative regulator of T-cell function. In this report, we demonstrate that A(2A)R stimulation not only inhibits the generation of adaptive effector T cells but also promotes the induction of adaptive regulatory T cells. In vitro, antigen recognition in the setting of A(2A)R engagement induces T-cell anergy, even in the presence of costimulation. T cells initially stimulated in the presence of an A(2A)R agonist fail to proliferate and produce interleukin-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma when rechallenged in the absence of A(2A)R stimulation. Likewise, in an in vivo model of autoimmunity, tissue-derived adenosine promotes anergy and abrogates tissue destruction. Indeed, A(2A)R stimulation inhibits interleukin-6 expression while enhancing the production of transforming growth factor-beta. Accordingly, treating mice with A(2A)R agonists not only inhibits Th1 and Th17 effector cell generation but also promotes the generation of Foxp3(+) and LAG-3(+) regulatory T cells. In this regard, A(2A)R agonists fail to prevent autoimmunity by LAG-3(-/-) clonotypic T cells, implicating an important role for LAG-3 in adenosine-mediated peripheral tolerance. Overall, our findings demonstrate that extracellular adenosine stimulates the A(2A)R to promote long-term T-cell anergy and the generation of adaptive regulatory T cells.

PMID:
17909080
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2200810
Free PMC Article

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